Re: NEDCC Expands Film Reformatting Capabilities

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IT'S TIME TO THINK ABOUT REFORMATTING YOUR FILM COLLECTIONS - Before
it's too late.


also worth reading:

http://www.cracked.com/article_19453_6-reasons-were-in-another-book-burning-period-in-history.html

"Imagine holding a beautiful, dusty, illustrated volume of Shakespeare printed in the 1700s, a calligraphic message from its long-dead owner inscribed on the inside cover, and throwing it straight in the trash. I've been there, more than once. I could have kept it and maybe gotten a few hundred dollars for it on eBay, if my supervisor wasn't watching with specific orders to prevent me from doing that."


I saw this working for a government department where everything was being 'modernised' - all our old records, some by historically significant figures were being digitised then the originals destroyed.

I'm all for digitizing. It means the digital copies of all those records were quickly accessible without having to wait for a folder to be retrieved from the records department, and in some cases posted to a remote location - each time risking further damage or potential loss of the original, the fact was, if this was to be the main purpose for having digital copies all would be OK.

The problem as I, and those who originally proposed the system saw it is that now the digital copies are all that most people see, it's a case of 'out of sight, out of mind' and the originals somehow became ephemeral. Thus the destruction began..

Of course plenty of these digital files how now been "lost" and the subsequent 'woops, mistake soz, won't happen again' might placate the director of such and such a department but what has been lost is gone for good. I know, I know.. decent backup regimes, competent staff yadda yadda.. but these things happen.

http://www.cracked.com/article_19656_5-lost-photos-that-could-have-changed-history_p2.html
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=106637066

"An exhaustive, three-year search for some tapes that contained the original footage of the Apollo 11 moonwalk has concluded that they were probably destroyed during a period when NASA was erasing old magnetic tapes and reusing them to record satellite data" - and so were the copies the aussies found and sent to NASA.. great.

I still maintain staring at a backup tape / hard drive and deciding what's on it is unimportant is a lot easier than holding an original book by Shakespear in one's grubby hands and deciding that it would burn well.



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