Re: comments

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Well, we don't have hills in Houston, only over passes that sort of give the same result!

Roger

Sent from my iPad

On Aug 12, 2011, at 7:15 PM, Lea Murphy <lea@xxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

> I think everyone should go out and take pictures of their horizon and send them it to the gallery.
> 
> Lea
> 
> 
> On Aug 12, 2011, at 7:12 PM, Roger Eichhorn wrote:
> 
>> Take some photos in a hilly country and try to figure out where the "horizon" is.  The best bet is to make sure that things that should be vertical are vertical -- usually trees or light or power poles.  Or just stand and look.  Same  problem.
>> 
>> Sorry about all the stuff that follows.  I've found that deleting blocks of text in an email is very difficult on an iPad.
>> 
>> Roger
>> 
>> Sent from my iPad
>> 
>> On Aug 12, 2011, at 6:55 PM, asharpe@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx wrote:
>> 
>>> I think the crux of the issue is that the *viewer* doesn't know that the
>>> terrain is tilted; all they can see is that the horizon in the *picture*
>>> is tilted. And if there are no other clues, the visual assumption is that
>>> it *should* have been level, but isn't. The "Dutch Tilt" works because it
>>> is *so* far off from level that the viewer must conclude either that the
>>> photographer intended it, or was drunk. :)
>>> 
>>> Andrew
>>> 
>>> 
>>> On Fri, August 12, 2011 3:50 pm, Don Roberts wrote:
>>>> Agreed, if we can resolve the "curved" versus "level" semantic issue.
>>>> But I stand by my original claim that the horizon does not need to be
>>>> level if the terrain is not.  Personal preferences I guess.  That is just
>>>> one of the many things that makes photography so compelling. Don
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> On 8/12/11 3:36 PM, MichaelHughes7A@xxxxxxx wrote:
>>>> 
>>>>> In a message dated 12/08/2011 16:47:02 GMT Daylight Time,
>>>>> elf@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx writes:
>>>>> 
>>>>> There is no point in time or place when the horizon is not level,
>>>>> sorry.
>>>>> 
>>>>> Given - both the Oxford English Dictionary and Webster's agree that
>>>>> the visible horizon is the point (or series of Points - my words) where
>>>>> the sea and the sky appear to meet. Many, but not all people, believe
>>>>> that the world is round, thus their perception must be that the horizon
>>>>> curves. Experience - whilst working in Europe for an American company
>>>>> one encounterd the view that some Americans feared that if they crossed
>>>>> the outer borders of their continent they would fall off. Michael
>>>>> 
>>>> 
>>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> your kids . my camera . we'll click
> www.leamurphy.com
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 




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