[Date Prev][Date Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next][Date Index][Thread Index]

Re: scale up (postgresql vs mssql)



On Sun, Apr 29, 2012 at 8:21 AM, Eyal Wilde <eyal@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:
> hi, all.
>
> well, i wondered why there is high rate of bo (blocks out). the procedure is
> practically read-only during the whole test. although it's not strictly
> read-only, because in a certain condition, there might be writing to a
> certain table. but that condition can not be met during this test.
>
> so, i created a ramdisk:
> mkfs -q /dev/ram2 100000
> mkdir -p /ram4
> mount /dev/ram2 /ram4
> df -H | grep /ram4
>
> and then:
> CREATE TABLESPACE pgram4 OWNER postgres LOCATION '/ram4';
>
> and in postgresql.conf i configured:
> temp_tablespaces = 'pgram4'
>
> now, i believe, all the temp-table were in RAM.
> vmstat showed:
> r b swpd free buff cache si so bi bo in cs us sy id wa st
> 6 0 0 5916720 69488 1202668 0 0 0 3386 1902 1765 25 3 72 1 0
> 9 1 0 5907728 69532 1204212 0 0 0 1392 5375 4510 88 8 3 1 0
> 7 0 0 5886584 69672 1205096 0 0 0 1472 5278 4520 88 10 2 0 0
> 8 0 0 5877384 69688 1206384 0 0 0 1364 5312 4522 89 8 2 1 0
> 8 0 0 5869332 69748 1207188 0 0 0 1296 5285 4437 88 8 3 1 0
> 6 1 0 5854404 69852 1208776 0 0 0 2955 5333 4518 88 9 2 0 0
>
> 10 times less bo (blocks out)
> 5 times less wa (percentage of time spent by cpu waiting to IO)
> 2 times less b (wait Queue – Process which are waiting for I/O)
>
> the overall test result was (just?) ~15% better...
>
> when i created the ramdisk with mkfs.ext4 (instead of the default ext2), the
> performance was the same (~15% better), but vmstat output looked much the
> same as before (without the ramdisk) !?? why is that?
>
> as i mentioned, the procedure is practically read-only. shouldn't i expect
> bo (blocks out) to be ~0? after forcing temp-tables to be in the RAM, what
> other reasons may be the cause for bo (blocks out)?
>
> i see no point pasting the whole procedure here, since it's very long. the
> general course of the procedure is:
> create temp-tables if they are not exist (practically, they do exist)
> do a lot of: insert into temp-table select from table
> and         : insert into temp-table select from table join temp-table....
> after finished insert into temp-table: analyze temp-table (this was the only
> way the optimizer behaved properly)
> finally, open refcursors of select from temp-tables

i/o writes from read queries can be caused by a couple of things:
*) sorts, and other 'spill to disk' features of large queries
*) hint bits (what I think is happening in your case):

the first time a tuple is touched after it's controlling transaction
is committed, the transaction's state (committed or aborted) is saved
on the tuple itself to optimize subsequent accesses.  for most
workloads this is barely noticeable but it can show up if you're
moving a lot of records around per transaction.

merlin

-- 
Sent via pgsql-performance mailing list (pgsql-performance@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx)
To make changes to your subscription:
http://www.postgresql.org/mailpref/pgsql-performance



[Postgresql General]     [Postgresql PHP]     [PHP Users]     [PHP Home]     [PHP on Windows]     [Kernel Newbies]     [PHP Classes]     [PHP Books]     [PHP Databases]     [Home]     [Yosemite]

Powered by Linux