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National Science Foundation Update Daily Digest Bulletin



Title: National Science Foundation Update Daily Digest

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Message: 1
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 12:40:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Negative Stereotypes Shown to Affect Learning, Not Just Performance

Negative Stereotypes Shown to Affect Learning, Not Just Performance
Tue, 03 Aug 2010 11:57:00 -0500

Robert J. Rydell While the effect of negative performance stereotypes on test-taking and in other domains is well documented, a study by Indiana University (IU) social psychologist Robert J. Rydell and his colleagues in IU's department of psychological and brain sciences is the first to show that the effects might also be seen further upstream than once thought, when the skills are learned, and not just performed.

Full story at http://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/15065.html

Source
Indiana University


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 2
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 12:40:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: In the 'Neck' of Time: Scientists Unravel Another Key Evolutionary Trait

In the 'Neck' of Time: Scientists Unravel Another Key Evolutionary Trait
Tue, 03 Aug 2010 11:58:00 -0500

a woman's neck By deciphering the genetics in humans and fish, scientists now believe that the neck--that little body part between your head and shoulders--gave humans so much freedom of movement that it played a surprising and major role in the evolution of the human brain, according to New York University and Cornell University neuroscientists in the online journal Nature Communications.

Full story at http://www.pressoffice.cornell.edu/releases/release.cfm?r=48699

Source
Cornell University


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 3
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 12:40:18 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Hormonal Birth Control Alters Scent Communication in Primates

Hormonal Birth Control Alters Scent Communication in Primates
Tue, 03 Aug 2010 11:58:00 -0500

a female ring-tailed lemur Hormonal contraceptives change the ways captive ring-tailed lemurs relate to one another both socially and sexually, according to a Duke University study that combined analyses of hormones, genes, scent chemicals and behavior.

Full story at http://news.duke.edu/2010/07/wrongsmell.html

Source
Duke University


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 4
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 12:40:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Brown Dwarf Found Orbiting a Young Sun-like Star

Brown Dwarf Found Orbiting a Young Sun-like Star
Tue, 03 Aug 2010 11:59:00 -0500

brown dwarf Astronomers have imaged a very young brown dwarf, or failed star, in a tight orbit around a young, nearby, sun-like star. The discovery is expected to shed light on the early stages of solar system formation.

Full story at http://uanews.org/node/33014

Source
University of Arizona


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 5
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 12:40:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Behind the Secrets of Silk Lie High-tech Opportunities

Behind the Secrets of Silk Lie High-tech Opportunities
Tue, 03 Aug 2010 11:57:00 -0500

image of a spider on its web of silk Tougher than a bullet-proof vest yet synonymous with beauty and luxury, silks spun by worms and spiders are a masterpiece of nature whose properties have yet to be fully replicated in the laboratory. But scientists have begun to unravel the secrets of silk. Tufts University biomedical engineers report that silk-based materials have been transformed from a commodity textile to a growing web of high-tech applications.

Full story at http://news.tufts.edu/releases/release.php?id=191

Source
Tufts University


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 6
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 12:40:19 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Study Finds Diet and Alcohol Alter Epigenetics of Breast Cancer

Study Finds Diet and Alcohol Alter Epigenetics of Breast Cancer
Tue, 03 Aug 2010 12:00:00 -0500

biology graphic Researchers from Brown University and the University of California have shown that the epigenetic profiles of breast tumors are related to patient diet and alcohol use as well as tumor size.

Full story at http://news.brown.edu/pressreleases/2010/07/epigenetics-breast-cancer-tumors

Source
Brown University


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 7
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 12:40:20 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Mechanical Regulation of Cell Substrates Effects Stem Cell Development, Adhesion

Mechanical Regulation of Cell Substrates Effects Stem Cell Development, Adhesion
Tue, 03 Aug 2010 12:00:00 -0500

stem cells plated on micropost arrays Bioengineers at the University of Pennsylvania have created a system to control the flexibility of the substrate surfaces on which cells are grown without changing the surface properties, providing a technique for more controlled lab experiments on cellular mechanobiology. This is an important step in the scientific effort to understand how cells sense and respond to mechanical forces in their environment.

Full story at http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/penn-s-flexible-approach-cell-substrates-mechanical-regulation-effects-stem-cell-development-ad

Source
University of Pennsylvania


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 8
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 12:40:20 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: MIT Researchers Show Silicon Can Be Made to Melt in Reverse

MIT Researchers Show Silicon Can Be Made to Melt in Reverse
Tue, 03 Aug 2010 11:57:00 -0500

a tiny silicon chip Like an ice cube on a warm day, most materials melt--that is, change from a solid to a liquid state--as they get warmer. But a few oddball materials do the reverse: they melt as they get cooler. Now a team of researchers at MIT has found that silicon, the most widely used material for computer chips and solar cells, can exhibit this strange property of "retrograde melting" when it contains high concentrations of certain metals dissolved in it.

Full story at http://web.mit.edu/press/2010/silicon-material.html

Source
Massachusetts Institute of Technology


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 9
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 07:14:40 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: National Science Foundation to Address Wireless Gridlock

National Science Foundation to Address Wireless Gridlock
Mon, 02 Aug 2010 15:31:00 -0500

Photo of NSFs Very Large Array radio telescope in New Mexico.

A workshop titled, "Enhancing Access to the Radio Spectrum" (EARS), will be held at the National Science Foundation (NSF) headquarters on Aug. 4, 5 and 6, 2010. Wireless services are estimated to directly or indirectly contribute some $700 billion to $1.4 trillion to the national economy annually. Even small improvements the use of radio spectrum could constitute a big economic impact.

The considerable talents of the academic research community, including ...

More at http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=117431&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


This is an NSF News item.


Message: 10
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 09:44:58 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Triggers of Volcanic Eruptions in Oregon's Mount Hood Investigated

Triggers of Volcanic Eruptions in Oregon's Mount Hood Investigated
Tue, 03 Aug 2010 08:41:00 -0500

Photo showing Mount Hood, Oregon, looking north from the White River Valley.

A new study has found that a mixing of two different types of magma is the key to the historic eruptions of Mount Hood, Oregon's tallest mountain, and that eruptions often happen in a relatively short time--weeks or months--after this mixing occurs.

This behavior is different from that of most other Cascade Range volcanoes, including Mount Hood's nearby, more explosive neighbor, Mt. St. Helens.

The research results are reported this week in the journal Nature ...

More at http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=117434&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click


This is an NSF News item.


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