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National Science Foundation Update Daily Digest Bulletin



Title: National Science Foundation Update Daily Digest

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Message: 1
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 13:40:21 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Why Surprises Temporarily Blind Us

Why Surprises Temporarily Blind Us
Tue, 16 Mar 2010 12:48:00 -0500

an inflated brain New research from Vanderbilt University reveals for the first time, how our brains coordinate two different types of attention and why we may be temporarily blinded by surprises.

Full story at http://sitemason.vanderbilt.edu/news/releases/2010/03/10/why-surprises-temporarily-blind-us.109330

Source
Vanderbilt University


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 2
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 13:40:21 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: New Imaging Technology Brings Trace Chemicals Into Focus

New Imaging Technology Brings Trace Chemicals Into Focus
Tue, 16 Mar 2010 12:47:00 -0500

fingerprint Arizona State University scientist N.J. Tao and his colleagues at the Biodesign Institute have hit on a new, versatile method to significantly improve the detection of trace chemicals important in such areas as national security, human health and the environment. Tao's team was able to detect and identify tiny particles of the explosive trinitrotoluene or TNT--each weighing less than a billionth of a gram--on the ridges and canals of a fingerprint.

Full story at http://asunews.asu.edu/20100311_tao

Source
Arizona State University


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 3
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 13:40:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Look at Mie!

Look at Mie!
Tue, 16 Mar 2010 12:49:00 -0500

plasmonics Rice students put calculations by German physicist Gustav Mie, made in 1908, to the test when they decided to look at the optical properties of single nanoparticles.

Full story at http://www.media.rice.edu/media/NewsBot.asp?MODE=VIEW&ID=13885&SnID=272993523

Source
Rice University


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 4
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 13:40:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Mathematical Model Can Help Communities Better Evaluate Sex Offender Policies

Mathematical Model Can Help Communities Better Evaluate Sex Offender Policies
Tue, 16 Mar 2010 12:49:00 -0500

Tony Grubesic A new mathematical model developed by Indiana University-Bloomington and Arizona State University geographers could help communities that are in the midst of passing or reforming sex offender laws. The researchers describe the model and report its first test in an early view edition of Papers in Regional Science.

Full story at http://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/13762.html

Source
Indiana University


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 5
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 13:40:22 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Phylogenetic Analysis of Mexican Cave Scorpions Suggests Adaptation to Caves is Reversable

Phylogenetic Analysis of Mexican Cave Scorpions Suggests Adaptation to Caves is Reversable
Tue, 16 Mar 2010 12:48:00 -0500

Typhochactas mitchelli A new study of the scorpion family Typhlochactidae, a group of nine dark-adapted species endemic to Mexico, shows that specialized traits are not necessarily an evolutionary dead end. At least three reversals, or a return to generalized morphology, were found in a phylogenetic analysis.

Full story at http://www.amnh.org/news/2010/03/mexican-cave-scorpions/

Source
American Museum of Natural History


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 6
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 13:40:23 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: New Analysis of the Structure of Silks Explains Paradox of Super-strength

New Analysis of the Structure of Silks Explains Paradox of Super-strength
Tue, 16 Mar 2010 12:49:00 -0500

spider web Spiders and silkworms are masters of materials science, but scientists are finally catching up. Silks are among the toughest materials known, stronger and less brittle, pound for pound, than steel. Now scientists at MIT have unraveled some of their deepest secrets in research that could lead the way to the creation of synthetic materials that duplicate, or even exceed, the extraordinary properties of natural silk.

Full story at http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2010/spider-silk-0315.html

Source
Massachusetts Institute of Technology


This is an NSF News From the Field item.


Message: 7
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 06:04:36 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Computing in the Cloud (CiC)

Computing in the Cloud (CiC)

Available Formats:
HTML: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10550/nsf10550.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_179
TXT: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10550/nsf10550.txt?WT.mc_id=USNSF_179
PDF: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10550/nsf10550.pdf?WT.mc_id=USNSF_179

Document Number: nsf10550


This is an NSF Publications item.


Message: 8
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Tue, 16 Mar 2010 16:52:47 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Software Infrastructure for Sustained Innovation (SI2)

Software Infrastructure for Sustained Innovation (SI2)

Available Formats:
HTML: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2010/nsf10551/nsf10551.htm?WT.mc_id=USNSF_25&WT.mc_ev=click

Document Number: nsf10551


This is an NSF Program Announcements and Information item.


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