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National Science Foundation Update Daily Digest Bulletin



Title: National Science Foundation Update Daily Digest

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Message: 1
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2008 15:08:12 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Bullies May Enjoy Seeing Others in Pain

Bullies May Enjoy Seeing Others in Pain

Photo of a bully taunting another boy.

Brain scans of young, aggressive bullies suggest they may actually enjoy seeing others in pain, according to a new University of Chicago study.

Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans of eight 16- to 18-year-old boys with aggressive conduct disorder and eight matched adolescents without conduct disorder led researchers to this new hypothesis. The study showed increased activity in an area of the brain associated with rewards when the aggressive boys watched a video clip of ...

More at http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=112582&govDel=USNSF_51


This is an NSF News item.


Message: 2
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2008 15:09:11 -0600 (CST)
Subject: In Alaska's Forests, Dried Mushrooms to the Rescue?

In Alaska's Forests, Dried Mushrooms to the Rescue?

Photo of mushrooms, sphagnum moss and cranberry.

The fight against climate warming has an unexpected ally: mushrooms growing in dry spruce forests covering Alaska, Canada, Scandinavia and other northern regions, according to new research.

Results of the study appear online Nov. 3, 2008, in a paper in the journal Global Change Biology.

When the soil in these forests is warmed, fungi that feed on dead plant material, such as mushrooms, dry out and produce significantly less ...

More at http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=112567&govDel=USNSF_51


This is an NSF News item.


Message: 3
From: National Science Foundation Update <nsf-update@xxxxxxx>
Date: Fri, 7 Nov 2008 15:21:59 -0600 (CST)
Subject: Ecologists Use Oceanographic Data to Predict Future Climate Change

Ecologists Use Oceanographic Data to Predict Future Climate Change

Map showing oceanographic data collected in the Arctic and North Atlantic oceans.

Ecologists and oceanographers are attempting to predict the future impacts of climate change by reconstructing the past behavior of Arctic climate and ocean circulation.

In a November special issue of the journal Ecology, a group of scientists report that if current patterns of change in the Arctic and North Atlantic Oceans continue, alterations of ocean circulation could occur on a global scale, with potentially dramatic implications for the world's climate and ...

More at http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=112592&govDel=USNSF_51


This is an NSF News item.


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